$TSLA – Marching towards $10T by 2030……

First Trillionaire and 10 Trillion dollar company.

This is my 4th post on the topic of $TSLA and never thought I would do one in 2021. My predictions was a valuation of $1T by 2030. That will come and pass rather soon.

My first post on $TSLA was back in June, 2017 where the core value long term I thought was Chemistry (Battery) and Intelligence (Full Self Driving/Autonomy). That continues to be the case with Elon’s battery day (Sep’20) & Tesla Autonomy day on April 2019.

So why $10T? That seems to be even more ridiculous than the $1T. Since Feb’20 to now it has gone by 4x and $600B market cap. While there are lots of bears, there are lots of bulls as well for the TSLA case.

Bull Case #1: The bull case is presented by Ark Invest (Source: Ark Invest). Having crossed 500K in 2020 and total of 1M+ with 2 additional factories (Austin and Berlin) yet to come online, getting to 1-2M by 2025 is highly likely and approaching 5M might be difficult, but then Elon has beaten the odds and the market is expecting him to with the demand.

2020Example Bear Case 2025
Cars Sold (millions)0.55Example Bull Case

10
Average Selling Price (ASP)$50,000$45,000$36,000
Electric Vehicle Revenue (billions)$26$234$367
Insurance Revenue (billions)Not Disclosed$23$6
Human-Driven Ride-Hail Revenue (net, billions)$0$42$0
Autonomous Ride-Hail Revenue (net, billions)$0$0$327
Electric Vehicle Gross Margin (ex-credits)21%40%25%
Total Gross Margin21%43%50%
Total EBITDA Margin*14%31%30%
Enterprise Value/EBITDA1621418
Market Cap (billions)673$1,500$4,000
Share Price**$700$1,500$4,000
Free Cash Flow Yield0.4%5%4.2%
Ark Invest Projections

What’s interesting is TSLA has single-handely taken out the $35K- $100K market which the Germans dominate and Toyota tried hard to penetrate with incremental engineering and marketing. TSLA changed the game and will perhaps go as low as $25K but not lower is my guess. TSLA will license IP (Chemistry and Intelligence) and let others make the cars. The entire $35K to $100K is now ‘owned’ by TSLA and its going to be harder for most makers other than the BMW or Mercedes and they will be supported by ardent fans latched onto the brands. 2018 data for segmentation of the various categories is shown here.

2018-worldwide-car-sales-segments

Source: https://carsalesbase.com/global-car-sales-2018/

As you can see from above, 62.8% of the market will be covered by Tesla with Model 3, Model Y, Model S, Cybertruck and perhaps upcoming new China sourced $25K model. That includes the SUV, Midsize, MPV, Pickup, Executive, Sport and Luxury segments. The total market size is 54M cars and if Tesla can get 20% of that category – which actually is possible (we are in winner take all world these days with Amazon, Google, Apple where its tech driven) relative to conventional wisdom of highly fragmented and splintered market for automobiles.

Bull Case #2: Its what I mentioned in the last year. One has to look at TSLA as a business of businesses. Expect in the next 5 years, either take the Alphabet (GOOG) route or via other routes (Spin-offs, M&As, SPACs ….) derivative businesses will emerge and stand on their own. To re-cap

  1. A car company
  2. A Battery company at planet scale
  3. An AI/ML company (machine vision in particular)
  4. An electric storage company
  5. An Electric Utility company (low value but at scale gets interesting)
  6. An energy distribution company
  7. A potential Cloud or computer company (if a book store turns into cloud computing, an autonomous car can have the right assets for becoming a cloud company)
  8. A big data/mapping/navigation company
  9. A carless car company (i.e. Uber/Lyft killer robotaxi)
  10. A machine vision driven robotics company
  11. and more to come….(more than letters in the Alphabet)

Elon himself quoted a version of this back in Oct’2020

Bull Case #3: Chemistry and Intelligence. Every tech category goes through vertical integration and horizontal stratification. I speculate Elon will build down to a $25K car and below that, he will ‘license’ IP (Chemistry and Intelligence or battery tech and autonomy tech) to get worldwide reach. It would not make sense to have factories all over the world for all geos – but a strong IP revenue model ($1-$2K/car) could be had and also enable new players in countries to become car companies – i.e. more local manufacturing and distribution. And not just limited to cars, for all kinds of transportation and perhaps energy sectors. From the chart above the remaining 35% of the segments (Compact, Sub-Compact, City-car) would belong in this category. Of the 86M cars sold in 2018 (I suspect its less in 2021), 30M cars would be in this category. If 20% of the manufacturers pay TSLA $1K-$2K – lets assume $1K – that is $6B of pure profits which is subsidized by the higher end. The TSLA brand will be more valuable and trusted over VW, Mercedes, BMW, Toyota by 2025 that most people would buy a car ‘Tesla powered’. At this rate of battery cost decline (see blow), these manufacturers who cannot afford R&D or manufacturing at scale would do well to buy it off TSLA. This is akin to INTC holding onto x86 and not having an IP model which let ARM into its turf. Imagine if INTC had both a vertically integrated model of CPUs and a licensing model for some components – AAPL would be in Intel’s camp and so would the big three hyperscalers. Pat Gelsinger is trying to get Intel back into that game in 2021 (which we will address in a different blog post). But if TSLA were to choose both models, a vertically integrated model for some categories and an IP or sub-component sale to other categories, they can cover the entire spectrum and make the brand even more ubiquitous and higher moat.

TSLA is handicapped relative to VW and Toyota on manufacturing scale and distribution reach. The aggressive ramp of manufacturing of the car and IP model will broaden the reach and create other businesses (Robo Taxi, Energy Storage/distribution, Cloud computing for AI and many more to come).

Bill Gates famouly said ” We overestimate what we can do in 2 years and underestimate what humanity will achieve in 10″. One has to do a version for Elon. He over-promises what’s coming in 2-3 years, but delivers on a 10 year vision. If you look back what he has said in 2011/2012 – and see what has been accomplished – its not that far off.

We will revisit this blog in 2025 if we have crossed the Ark Invest marker and if TSLA is barrelling past $3-$4T and march towards the first $10T company on the planet (or maybe a collection of companies).

OEM -> ODM -> OCM?

The OEM supply chain model has been in existence in multiple industries including computing for a long time. In the computing industry, Original Equipment Model (OEM) was perhaps kickstarted in a formal way in the 1980s  with the emergence of the PC and Intel with its processors. Prior to the PC and perhaps the Apple Mac, in the 70s, computing was delivered by vertically integrated companies. Notable ones are IBM, DEC, Prime, ICL (England), Wang, Sperry, Burroughs etc.  The OEM model led to the separation of the various layers in the delivery chain. Specifically, the chip (or processor) as a business came into full force and the separation of the processor, software (Microsoft) and the delivery of these two as an integrated platform led to the emergence of the OEM business.

Over the past 30 years, the OEM model was supplanted by the ODM (Original Design and Manufacturing) companies (like Quanta, Tyan) from Taiwan and China. That model was perhaps kickstarted in the late 1990s driven by Intel and emergence of the Taiwan/China manufacturing capabilities. This model exploded from 2000 onwards with the emergence of the cloud companies as the end customer.

The value in OEM model is the integration of either silicon (engineered by the OEM) and/or Software. Typically both Silicon and Software (as demonstrated by companies like Sun, Cisco, EMC, SGI and many more).  Over time, the consolidation of the silicon (for processors, it was Intel, for switches – it is Broadcom) combined with the emergence of open source software (Linux to start with, but perhaps a whole lot of other components that is found in apache.org) has eroded the key value proposition. After 30 years, with the consolidation in the industry (EMC/Dell as an example), has the OEM model run its course?

The value in the ODM model is in the manufacturing (cost-effective) and scale. To some extent the ODM model eroded one of the key capabilities of OEM given the consolidation of key semiconductor components (processors, switch/networking ASIC, storage controllers). But the inability of the ODM companies to move up the value chain (either own the silicon or the key SW IP), they have reached a plateau with nowhere to go but continue to manufacture at scale and do it cost effectively. The notion that an ODM can disrupt the OEMs has not happened. Sure, they have had an impact on many companies, but the 70/30 rule applies. The OEMs that have had strong band equity, have retained their position and the only the smaller OEMs have lost their business to ODMs.

Here’s a simple visual of the value chain.

Image result for OEM vs ODM

But is it time now for the emergence of a new model?    The OEM model is now facing a perfect storm. . One component of the perfect storm is the cloud as a business. The second disruptor is the emergence of Software Defined X (Compute, storage, Network) and in many cases tied to open-source . The third element of the disruption and the main disruption is the value shift to the component i.e. the semiconductor component. This I would term as the emergence of the OCM model.

oem_odm_ocm

OCM stands for Original Component Manufacturer as typified by companies like Intel, Broadcom but the more interesting ones are Seagate, Western Digital, Micron, Samsung.  The visual above show the three different supply chain models. The OEM model relies on the ODM as well to deliver the end system to the customer. The OCM model as typified by component companies (one good example is Mellanox – which sells chips and switches) leveraging either 3rd party or open source software to deliver system level solution to the same target customers that OEMs have addressed. While there are significant challenges in the evolution of OCM to have the same capability as the OEM, the OCM already have customers like the big cloud providers (AWS, Google, Microsoft). with a significant portion of their business (soon to be 40%) being protected by direct sell to these cloud providers which will grow while potentially  seeing reduction in profit margins. This has two effects for the OCMs. They have to find alternative higher margin (absolute margin) models as well as being able to challenge OEMs and ODMs as a good percentage of their business is already shifting to major cloud providers.

So, will these OCMs emerge? Back to the Wintel model of value shifting to component and software, but in the case, the OCM becomes the integrator of the SW along with the component to deliver a complete system. Unlike the ODM, the OCM has both financial and technical capabilities to move up the value chain.

Lets revisit this in 2020 and see if this happens.

Update – March 2019 – Nvidia to acquire Mellanox. Both companies designs and sells chips and makes boxes. Nvidia with DGX-2 (ML boxes) and Mellanox with switches..

https://nvidianews.nvidia.com/news/nvidia-to-acquire-mellanox-for-6-9-billion